Author: Stuart

Developing the Language of the Domain

Earlier this year, I wrote a piece for the Cognitect blog: Developing the Language of the Domain (blog.cognitect.com) In it, I describe the process of building a domain-driven application using Clojure, ClojureScript, EDN, Datomic, clojure.spec, Pedestal, and Om.

How to ns

Quick link: Stuart’s ns Style Guide Everyone has their own personal quirks when it comes to syntax. No matter how hard you try to lock it down with code review, IDEs, scripts, or check-in hooks, individual differences will emerge.

End of the Free Lunch

I’m part of that awkward, in-between cohort, a little too young to fit in with Gen Xers but — although we grew up with computers like our younger siblings, the much-loathed Millennials — still old enough to recall life before the Internet. The Oregon Trail Generation still remembers, dimly, the screech of a dial-up modem…

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Apathy of the Commons

Eight years ago, I filed a bug on an open-source project. HADOOP-3733 appeared to be a minor problem with special characters in URLs. I hadn’t bothered to examine the source code, but I assumed it would be an easy fix. Who knows, maybe it would even give some eager young programmer the opportunity to make…

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Fixtures as Caches

I am responsible — for better or for worse — for the library which eventually became clojure.test. It has remained largely the same since it was first added to the language distribution back in the pre-1.0 days. While there are many things about clojure.test which I would do differently now — dynamic binding, var metadata,…

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Open-source Bundling

Cast your mind back to the halcyon days of the late ’90s. Windows 95/98. Internet Explorer 4. Before you laugh, consider that IE4 included some pretty cutting-edge technology for the time: Dynamic HTML, TLS 1.0, single sign-on, streaming media, and “Channels” before RSS. IE4 even pioneered — unsuccessfully — the idea of “web browser as…

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How to Name Clojure Functions

This is a guide on naming Clojure functions. There are exceptions to every rule. When you’re defining something based on natural language, there are more exceptions than rules. I break these rules more often than I follow them. This guide is just a starting point for thinking about how to name things. Pure functions Pure…

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Clojure Don’ts: Lazy Effects

This is probably my number one Clojure Don’t. Laziness is often useful. It allows you to express “infinite” computations, and only pay for as much of the computation as you need. Laziness also allows you to express computations without specifying when they should happen. And that’s a problem when you add side-effects. By definition, a…

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